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Displaying items by tag: shabbat
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Friday, 25 February 2011 18:21

when the honeymoon is over

art-newhouseSix days work may be done, but on the seventh day you shall have sanctity, a day of complete rest to the Lord; whoever performs work thereon [on this day] shall be put to death. — Exodus 35:2

We see with our own eyes how often a person neglects his duty in spite of his awareness of it and in spite of his having come to recognize as a truth what is required for the salvation of his soul and what is incumbent upon him in respect to his Creator. This neglect is due not to an inadequate recognition of his duty nor to any other cause but the increasing weight of his laziness upon him; so that he says, "I will eat a little," or "I will sleep a little," or "It is hard for me to leave the house," or "I have taken off my shirt, how can I put it on again?" (Canticles 5:3). "It is very hot outside," "It is very cold," or "It is raining too hard" and all the other excuses and pretenses that the mouth of fools is full of. Either way, the Torah is neglected, Divine service dispensed with, and the Creator abandoned. — Rabbi Moshe Chaim Luzzatto, The Path of the Just, Chapter 6, pages 38-40

Published in torah
Thursday, 10 February 2011 20:13

avoiding flat tires

art-flattire Now we will discuss humility in relation to one's deeds.  This [subject] has four parts to it:  conducting oneself in a lowly manner; bearing disparagement; being averse to [positions of] authority and fleeing from honor; and respecting others.  --Rabbi Moshe Chaim Luzzatto, The Path of the Just, page 156

Published in daily living
Friday, 08 October 2010 20:51

do not kindle flame

art-candlesAs I write this my beloved wife is on the other side of the country for a weekend women’s retreat.   It is a Friday afternoon and my awareness of the coming Shabbat seems to be elevated in her absence.  The many things that I take for granted come to the forefront of my mind as those responsibilities shift to me this weekend.  The Shabbat is a wonderful thing for a family in this modern age of busyness and distractions.   The Shabbat comes whether we are prepared or not and can often be a great challenge to glide into smoothly. 

Published in torah

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